Building Belief: A New Model For Activating Corporate Character and Authentic Advocacy

In 2007 the Arthur W. Page Society published The Authentic Enterprise, which identified radical transformations occurring in the business environment – the digital networking revolution, growing demands for corporate transparency, and rapid globalization – and the ways these were altering how organizations address their communications strategies. The emergence of these changes (which are today the norm) led the Page Society to develop a model that describes the distinctly valuable enterprise leadership role that communications plays in this new environment, and how it can best be undertaken.

This Page Model (formerly "New Model") is put forth here in Building Belief, which was developed on the basis of a survey of chief communications officers from such companies as Johnson & Johnson, P&G, Apple, eBay, Pepsico, FedEx and IBM about how their roles and functions are changing.

The Page New Model for Enterprise Communications

The Page Model begins with the concept of "Corporate Character," the definition and alignment of mission, purpose, values, culture, business model, strategy, operations and brand to create the unique, differentiating identity of the enterprise. The organization must authentically embody that character in every interaction in order to be deserving of trust.

Then, to earn trust with stakeholders, the CCO, using insights derived from behavioral and cognitive science, follows the Authentic Advocacy portion of the model. This starts with building Shared Belief, which then leads decision-makers to take Action on the basis of those beliefs (e.g. to make a purchase, invest their money, accept a job offer, support policy objectives, etc.). Consequently, confidence is built as their actions lead to positive outcomes.

Advocacy at Scale is achieved by empowering individuals to share their experiences with others. Through consistent, authentic engagement, individuals become advocates, which begins the cycle again as shared belief is built with new stakeholders, leading to more actions.

In the Press

additional materials

Test Driving the New Model May 14, 2012

Marketing models tend to be wallpaper to me. I'm more interested in seeing what's beneath the surface. During strategy reviews delivered via PowerPoint-enhanced charts, graphs and model diagrams, my colleagues often hear me say, “What do we do...

Article tags:
read more 6 comments
Gary Sheffer, GE (New Model)
March 12, 2012
Gary Sheffer, GE (New Model)
Coffee & Courage: Starbucks Shows Why Corporate Character Matters June 15, 2015

The Page Model tells us that the CCO's role begins with defining, curating and instilling corporate character - the beliefs, the values, the culture, the purpose and the actions that define an enterprise. At the 2014 Page Society Annual Conference we...

Jon Iwata, SVP for Marketing and Communications, IBM Corporation (New Comms Model)
March 26, 2012
Jon Iwata, SVP for Marketing and Communications, IBM Corporation (New Comms Model)
The CVS Health Case Study: A Test of Corporate Character May 5, 2015

The following blog post was authored by Maggie Christ, Renáta Sándor and Andrew Tonne, whose case study was awarded the Jack Koten Page Principles Case Study Award for their entry into the 2015 Case Study Competition in Corporate Communications. They...

Wendi Strong, USAA (New Model for Communications)
February 23, 2012
Wendi Strong, USAA (New Model for Communications)
Jon Iwata, Chairman, Arthur W. Page Society (New Comms Model)
March 26, 2012
Jon Iwata, Chairman, Arthur W. Page Society (New Comms Model)
Roger Bolton, President of the Page Society (New Model)
March 27, 2012
Roger Bolton, President of the Page Society (New Model)